AetherSmith

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  • in reply to: TV compatibility report thread #18268
    AetherSmith
    Participant

    I did see somewhat similar results on my M70-C3 (the equivalent 2015 model) with HDMI 1-4 displaying much better compatibility than 5, though they of course gave higher lag. However, HDMI 5 hasn’t had any issues with 3x since several OSSC firmwares ago, while 5x has consistently never worked on that port. I also have a PS4 Pro, but I’ve never seen any kind of handshake issues like you describe.

    The one odd thing I did notice for my first couple years of using this TV was that the video would occasionally drop for a second with 4K sources (I know it was the TV and not the source, because my sound system kept playing the audio properly). That’s cleared up in the past six months or so, though, possibly due to a firmware update for the TV.

    Don’t know how much that helps, but I figure a little more info can’t hurt.

    in reply to: TV compatibility report thread #14253
    AetherSmith
    Participant

    Okay, as promised, I’ve just finished updating my report on the Vizio M70-C3 (https://videogameperfection.com/forums/topic/tv-compatibility/page/4/#post-10298) to reflect the latest firmware. Sorry for the delay in getting this up, but I’ve been dealing with some extremely painful family circumstances in the meantime.

    in reply to: Best place to buy SCART cables #13566
    AetherSmith
    Participant

    Csync is preferred when available, but there are some consoles (PSX, PS2, 1CHIP-03 SNES, some N64s depending on the RGB mod) that only output luma sync, which I don’t believe makes any appreciable difference in picture quality. The main thing is to avoid sync-on-composite, which is the one that can really result in artifacting.

    Note that stores will offer Csync cables for consoles not supporting Csync, which means there’s an added sync stripper inside the cable. The OSSC supports all three sync types, so there’s no benefit to these over the regular ones passing the original sync signal from the console.

    For my part, I’ve gotten all my cables from retrogamingcables.co.uk (funnily enough, for a Canadian it actually ends up being cheaper to get them from the UK than the US), and I haven’t seen any of the issues rebrove mentioned.

    in reply to: TV compatibility report thread #13246
    AetherSmith
    Participant

    @harrumph Will do when I get the chance, I’ve just been a little pressed for time recently. I’ve also been following a possible lead on a PVM from a local broadcast station, so hopefully I’ll be able to confirm this series’ reputation for low lag for myself.

    in reply to: TV compatibility report thread #13166
    AetherSmith
    Participant

    That’s surprising, I’ve got a 2015 M70-C3 (exact same series, just a larger size), and I’ve been quite pleased with its compatibility.

    I don’t think TV compatibility should affect audio, are you able to get sound from anything else? At least on a stock OSSC, the 3.5mm jack is a direct passthrough of the SCART port’s audio; the OSSC doesn’t even need to be powered for it to work. Is it possible that there might be an issue with the SCART cable or your HDMI audio mod?

    On the video side, how often are you seeing drops with your SNES, and on what firmware? I’ve very occasionally seen some for x3 and x4 with 0.76 on my M70-C3, but they were on the order of less than once per hour.

    in reply to: OSSC stays dead when powered up #12403
    AetherSmith
    Participant

    @zugspitzjockl Are you sure things are okay with the power? At least on my build, the LCD backlight would still light as long as it was getting power, regardless of whether it was getting any commands from the FPGA.


    @LazyEpic
    Is there any behavior from the LEDs?

    I was thinking that the chip from my kit was missing its firmware for a while, but it turned out to be an almost imperceptible short to ground on one of the QFPs.

    AetherSmith
    Participant

    Is it just me, or is the XRGB Wiki page blank all of the sudden? I’m seeing this across every device and browser I’ve tried.

    in reply to: Screen rotate option – Is it possible? #10907
    AetherSmith
    Participant

    I believe this is a duplicate of https://videogameperfection.com/forums/topic/rotate-screen-180-degrees/.

    Unfortunately, rotation is impossible without a full framebuffer (and would unavoidably add a full frame of lag).

    in reply to: TV compatibility report thread #10433
    AetherSmith
    Participant

    @harrumph

    I did try a few different things, and I found that the linetriple is a fair bit more stable when I run the signal through my AV receiver (a Denon AVR-S910W), though still not what I would call playable for anything action-based. Changing the HDMI Tx mode has no effect at all, and the sync drops are definitely on the digital side of the equation, as I’ve kept an eye on the OSSC during the drops and there’s never so much as a flicker of red from the LEDs. Normal linedouble works fine, which would also rule out an analog sync issue.

    I’ve switched off all the postprocessing features on the TV and AVR and switched them into their respective gaming low-latency modes, but I don’t have a CRT handy to get a good measure of how much lag may still be introduced by the chain. Experimenting with some of the pair’s processing features seemed to improve stability in some cases but worsen it in others, so I ultimately chalked up any improvement to the TV’s handling of the OSSC’s out-of-spec signal just being unpredictable.

    in reply to: Troubleshooting JTAG Programmer #10408
    AetherSmith
    Participant

    Huh, well what do you know, that did the trick! Not sure if the driver is any different between your link and the one that comes with the current version of Quartus, but the Quartus 13 programmer that came with the download was much more stable and responsive in use. Maybe the blaster I got just really doesn’t like Quartus 16.

    in reply to: 480p lineX2 mode, letterboxed on a 1080p signal #10393
    AetherSmith
    Participant

    Right, that’s what I meant by “partial framebuffer”, sorry if that was unclear. As you say, it doesn’t need to buffer the whole frame, just the lines that arrive while it’s busy drawing borders.

    in reply to: Troubleshooting JTAG Programmer #10356
    AetherSmith
    Participant

    I think I got the official Altera drivers installed properly; I followed the instructions on the wiki and I don’t see anything wrong in the device manager. Anything look off to you?

    Altera Drivers

    in reply to: TV compatibility report thread #10298
    AetherSmith
    Participant

    Vizio M70-C3

    Okay, I completely removed the old report because it was based on a firmware several versions old; this report is based on v0.77 on a v1.5 DIY kit.

    Update: Upgraded to v0.78; no changes in compatibility. Added result for Sega Master System.
    Update: Added notes on the quirks of HDMI5 regarding pixel aspect ratio, results for GameCube and PSP.

    Like many of the current crop of 4K TVs, the M70-C3 will perform differently depending on which HDMI port is used. For my testing, I used HDMI5 (the sole 4K@60-enabled port) and HDMI4 (one of the others). I did my actual testing with the OSSC plugged directly into the port being tested, but later confirmed that switching the signal through my AVR (a Denon AVR-S910W) with all the HDMI processing features turned off did not affect stability or lag.

    I did testing using the 240p test suite for both Wii and Dreamcast (the only two consoles I can run it on at the moment), with RGB SCART sources switched through a gscartsw_lite, component through an Impact Acoustics 6/2 switch, and Dreamcast VGA plugged directly into the OSSC. For lag testing, I tested against a Sony PVM-14M4U I managed to get ahold of recently. I made sure to set the monitor up so that, in the frame of the test photos, it roughly matched the height and vertical positioning of the TV in order to avoid the risk of rolling-shutter error.

    HDMI5

    Lag: ~1 Frame
    240p/480i Resync: ~3.3 Seconds

    240p Passthrough: No
    240p x2: Yes
    240p x3: Yes
    240p x4: No
    240p x5: No

    480i Passthrough: No
    480i x2: Yes
    480i x3: No
    480i x4: No

    480p Passthrough: Yes
    480p x2: No

    1080i Passthrough: Yes
    1080i x2: Yes

    Notes: This input is less compatible, but has far less picture processing and lag. In fact, this input seems to be unable to do any actual interpolation, simply doing the maximum possible integer scale of whatever it receives: 720p and 1080i/p use the full screen, while 480p signals seem to be multiplied to 4x and then windowboxed. The lack of interpolation capability does lead to an unexpected quirk (which I missed at first), which is that all content is displayed with square pixels regardless of its intended pixel aspect ratio. This is all well and good for any HD or 480p VGA content, but it means that any 480p DTV content ends up displayed at an aspect ratio of 3:2 rather than 4:3 or 16:9.

    HDMI4

    Lag: ~3-5 Frames
    240p/480i Resync: ~2.5 Seconds

    240p Passthrough: No
    240p x2: Yes
    240p x3: Yes
    240p x4: Yes
    240p x5: Yes (All Modes)

    480i Passthrough: Yes
    480i x2: Yes
    480i x3: No
    480i x4: No

    480p Passthrough: Yes
    480p x2: No

    1080i Passthrough: Yes
    1080i x2: Yes

    Notes: This input is much more compatible, but also has much more lag and intrusive picture processing. There are a few possible scaling options for a given resolution, supporting both 4:3 and 16:9 games when using a 480i/p console. Since this input has full interpolation capabilities, it doesn’t share the issue regarding pixel aspect ratio.

    Consoles Tested

    NES (NESRGB – RGB SCART)
    Master System (RGB SCART)
    Genesis (RGB SCART)
    Super Nintendo (RGB SCART)
    PlayStation (RGB SCART)
    Saturn (RGB SCART)
    Nintendo 64 (THS7314 Amp – RGB SCART)
    Dreamcast (Kuro – VGA)
    PlayStation 2 (Component)
    GameCube (D-Terminal w/ component adapter)
    Xbox (Component)
    PlayStation Portable (Component)
    Wii (Component)

    Other Thoughts

    In general, both inputs were quite stable with signals from the latest firmware version

    While the processing is lighter on HDMI5, it’s not entirely absent. It’s most noticeable in causing the scanlines to seemingly group into pairs of two that have a thin, hard-edged dark line between them and thicker, softer-edged lines on either side. I don’t find it visible from my viewing distance (about 10 feet from the 70″ TV), but if I were a bit closer it would definitely prove annoying.

    Interestingly, when forced to resync, the picture doesn’t return on HDMI5 until around a second after the resolution information is displayed onscreen. When using HDMI4, by contrast, the picture returns at the same time its resolution info appears. This discrepancy appears to account for the shorter resync time when using HDMI4.

    Overall, I’m reasonably pleased with the TV’s compatibility with the OSSC. I’m perfectly happy with linetriple for classic games, while I can bear with the lag to properly scale the 480i/p of later games. While I’d definitely be interested if a good 4K video scaler comes on the market to add to the chain here, as it stands now I’m happy enough with the setup as it is. Since my AVR has dual outputs, I was able to pretty easily set things up so that I can switch between HDMI4 and HDMI5 for the best of both worlds.

    in reply to: Leftover Spare Parts Available #10271
    AetherSmith
    Participant

    Yep, still available. There doesn’t seem to be PM functionality on this board, so why don’t I get in touch on the Shmups forum? You’re @Salacorn over there, as well, right?

    in reply to: 480p lineX2 mode, letterboxed on a 1080p signal #10222
    AetherSmith
    Participant

    I don’t think that would be possible without at least a partial framebuffer, and I’m not sure if the OSSC’s current hardware is sufficient to add one. Right now it just stores a single line at a time to multiply, but windowboxing would require enough memory to buffer all the lines it receives while it’s busy drawing the borders.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 25 total)