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  • in reply to: Firmware update troubles: #20872
    FBX
    Participant

    @nmalinoski, well I don’t know what was causing the CRC check to fail then. I tried it a good 30 times and it wouldn’t work. Then I tried non-audio 0.80 and that worked on the first try, which then lead into 0.80a working first try. Same card, same software imager, same file.

    in reply to: Saturn optimal settings #20864
    FBX
    Participant

    It should be the same for model 2. I just specify which model I used just in case people blow a gasket and yell at me for my profiles not working on their particular console revision.

    in reply to: Saturn optimal settings #20857
    FBX
    Participant

    Okay here are my research results, with links to my screen grabs of each example (note you will need to right-click on each image and select “View Image” to see full detail):

    Sega Saturn NTSC Model 1 OSSC optimal timings:

    320×224 (Game Example: World Heroes Perfect [has in-game letterboxing] )

    Video in proc.:

    Video LPF = 9MHz

    Ouput: (for 240p/288p proc)

    Make sure whatever linex you use is set to “320×240 opt.”

    Sync opt.:

    Analog sync LPF = 10MHz (I tend to base all my profiles on this setting)

    Sampling opt. <Adv. timing > 320×240

    H. samplerate = 427
    H. active = 320

    I didn’t have to change H. synclen or H. backporch as it happened to fall dead center on my capture card.

    Sampling opt.:

    Sampling phase = 225 degrees (this will differ from console to console).

    World Heroes Perfect 4x optimal screenshot

    ——————–

    352×224 (Game example: All of the various Capcom arcade fighting game ports)

    Video in proc.:

    Video LPF = 9MHz (vital for some saturn consoles in 352 and 704 res modes)

    Ouput: (for 240p/288p proc)

    Make sure whatever linex you use is set to “320×240 opt.”

    Sync opt.:

    Analog sync LPF = 10MHz (I tend to base all my profiles on this setting)

    Sampling opt. <Adv. timing > 320×240

    H. samplerate = 455
    H. active = 352

    I didn’t have to change H. synclen or H. backporch as it happened to fall dead center on my capture card.

    Sampling opt.:

    Sampling phase = 225 degrees (this will differ from console to console).

    Street Fighter Alpha 2 4x optimal screenshot

    ——————–

    704x480i (Game example: Virtua Fighter 2 [stage areas] )

    Video in proc.:

    Video LPF = 9MHz (vital for some saturn consoles in 352 and 704 res modes)

    Sync opt.:

    Analog sync LPF = 10MHz (I tend to base all my profiles on this setting)

    Sampling opt. <Adv. timing > 480i

    H. samplerate = 910
    H. synclen = 62
    H. backporch = 98
    H. active = 704

    Sampling opt.:

    Sampling phase = 225 degrees (this will differ from console to console).

    Note the optimal timing couldn’t perfectly fine-tune the dot alignment. Some slight ghosting appears on hard edges.

    Virtua Fighter 2 4x optimal screenshot

    in reply to: Saturn optimal settings #20849
    FBX
    Participant

    Sorry there’s been a delay on the video for the Saturn. I got caught up in designing an audio amp board for the model 1 Genesis for RCA output (better quality than the headphone jack).

    I’ll set up the Saturn and write down the optimal timing settings for each mode (320, 352, 704). Give me an hour or two to confirm best possible results.

    in reply to: SNES 5x Pixel Sharpness Help #20847
    FBX
    Participant

    Those pictures definitely look like the sharpness of the display itself is turned way up. Make sure that isn’t the case. It’s not that the image is ‘blocky’, but rather you’ve got edge enhancements that are causing the edges of pixels to have ringing artifacts.

    Edit: According to the manual, the TV does have an edge enhancement feature in the advanced settings menu. So of course make sure that’s turned off too.

    in reply to: Firmware update troubles: #20839
    FBX
    Participant

    Update 2: I got around the issue by updating to non-audio version 0.80 and then updating to the audio version, which passed CRC check no problem this time. So I have to believe there’s something in audio version 0.79 that thinks the audio version 0.80 is invalid.

    in reply to: Firmware update troubles: #20838
    FBX
    Participant

    Update: Tested version 80 (non audio), and that passes CRC check. It’s the audio version that doesn’t. Problem is I’m using an OSSC that needs the audio version.

    in reply to: Tips & Tweaks: Lx3, Lx4, Lx5 modes #17799
    FBX
    Participant

    Followup:

    Okay so this took some serious testing to discover, but it turns out the default 720x480p H. samplerate of 858 really is correct for the XBOX. The smearing of pixels is actually coming from the XBOX itself! On Capcom vs SNK 2 EO, the 640 width is extended to 654, causing grids in some of the grooves and other frames to be linearly interpolated on the horizontal axis. It’s the weirdest quirk of console graphic output I’ve seen yet, and I don’t understand why the XBOX version of this game does this.

    in reply to: Tips & Tweaks: Lx3, Lx4, Lx5 modes #17786
    FBX
    Participant

    So I’ve been trying to hunt down optimal timings for 2x 480p mode on the XBOX component output signal and I’ve come to the conclusion that it can’t be done. Every setting of H. samplerate has some sort of interpolation. To make certain, I found raw screenshots of Capcom vs SNK 2 EO that showed the game most definitely ran in 640×448. When I zero in on the width of a groove bar and adjust H. samplerate to match it (and fine-tuning with sampling phase), I found the vertical grid lines of the groove bar were a mess from the live feed, even though the total width matched identically with the raw bitmap image. Now I will point out this technique worked flawlessly when I wanted to find the optimal timing of FFX on the PS2. Once I learned the game ran at 512×416, I based the H. samplerate on that and the pixels came into perfect clarity. This is just not working for 480p XBOX, and I’ve tried everything I can think of. I’m of the opinion that component output on the Xbox does some sort of interpolation such that you can never get perfect clarity of the pixels.

    in reply to: Official "Where's my OSSC 1.6?" thread #16218
    FBX
    Participant

    Woot! Got my tracking number today!

    in reply to: Official "Where's my OSSC 1.6?" thread #16195
    FBX
    Participant

    So I should be getting a tracking number soon since the power supplies finally arrived. My June 30th order was held up waiting for the PSU from what I understand. Hoping to get notified soon!

    in reply to: Official "Where's my OSSC 1.6?" thread #15874
    FBX
    Participant

    I must be one of the 100 ‘unlucky’ ones because I ordered mine all the way back on June 30th, and have not received any notification of it being shipped.

    in reply to: Official "Where's my OSSC 1.6?" thread #14176
    FBX
    Participant

    @Jdurg, Nice Zelda II reference! 😛

    in reply to: 4:3 -> 8:7 Aspect Ratio correction for SNES #14140
    FBX
    Participant

    Just wanted to set the record straight about aspect correction on the SNES for the OP: The examples you posted are as you know, games where the artists either could not or forgot to account for aspect correction. So those perfect circles were never perfect back when they were displayed on the current technology of the times. This is mostly due to memory constraints. Tiles were square because memory is stored that way (i.e. 8×8, 16×16).

    However, there are several games where the artists did take into account aspect correction. Take the Magus Tower in Chrono Trigger for example. The intro scene that pans down the top of the tower with the moon in the background very CLEARLY was designed for aspect correction. So if you play this game at 1:1 square pixels, you’re just playing it wrong.

    Now here comes the important part: People generally get wrong how to aspect correct the SNES. They think you take the 256×224 active area and stretch that to a 4:3 image. That’s not how it works. Instead, a formula is devised based on the pixel clock rate. In the case of the NES, SNES, and Genesis’s 256×224 mode, the formula is 256 * 8/7, which equals about 293×224 for proper aspect correction. When scaling, the most accurate approach is to scale first and then apply the formula. So 2x scale would be (256 * 2) * (8/7) = 585×448 and 3x scale would be (256 * 3) * (8/7) = 878×672 and so on. Of course it’s better to use multiples of 2 when it comes to digital displays, so for 1x scale: 292×224, and 2x scale: 584×448.

    But yeah, just wanted to set the record straight that while you may prefer the perfect circles in the handful of games that didn’t account for AR, it’s still technically wrong, and is merely a novelty to see square pixels in this regard.

Viewing 14 posts - 16 through 29 (of 29 total)