Harrumph

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  • in reply to: New OSSC went bad – HDMI audio problem #43124
    Harrumph
    Participant

    Since it is on the 3.5mm out as well, I don’t think it’s anything with the HDMI. My guess is a bad solder joint on the ground connections on the SCART (AV1) input. Try to reflow them.

    in reply to: Ossc no sound hdmi #43123
    Harrumph
    Participant

    Oh right, I mixed up when they switched from DVI-D, sorry.

    in reply to: Ossc no sound hdmi #43106
    Harrumph
    Participant

    Did you verify it is a 1.6 model (in case the previous owner was mistaken)?

    in reply to: Ossc no sound hdmi #43075
    Harrumph
    Participant

    Could be a solder issue I guess on the contacts to audio chip. But I don’t know how one would check that. You can always return it if it’s on warranty still.

    Harrumph
    Participant

    The output is not independent. The output is a direct multiplier of the input sampling clock. Line counts and refresh rate cannot be altered. That is simply how the OSSC works. So the output is often quite far from VESA or CEA standards. While you can influence the pixel clock by adjusting sample rate, there are limits to this because it will affect the aspect ratio.

    E.g. while x5 1600×1200 of NES in generic mode is 161 MHz (at 2046 sample rate * 262 * 5 * 60.08), very close to 1600×1200 VESA without reduced blanking (specs compatible with CRT monitors) at 160.9 MHz BUT it still has too high horizontal frequency due to having more lines than standard, AND it is way off VESA with reduced blanking (130 MHz), which is the standard adapted for flat screens. (CRT monitors need longer blanking due to the ray gun physically needing to move back across the screen to draw the next line).

    If you try using 1920×1200 mode on your widescreen monitors, that may fare better. While OSSC output pixel clock is still 161 MHz (at defaults, for NES), the VESA reduced blanking standard for that mode is 153 MHz, so you are in closer range. You will get even closer if you lower the sample rate to 1950 (as mentioned in tweaks thread), then output is 153.5 MHz, BUT then you have reduced the line so much there is barely space for sync and backporch (1950-1920= 30, which needs to fit both sync and backporch), and your monitor may reject the signal for that reason.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by Harrumph.
    in reply to: GameCube and GameBoy Player help needed #42947
    Harrumph
    Participant

    Great!

    Harrumph
    Participant

    Press BTN0 until you are back to a valid mode for your capture card.
    And get a remote.
    For future reference:
    http://junkerhq.net/xrgb/index.php?title=OSSC

    Harrumph
    Participant

    PAL PS1 has an extra line compared to normal 50Hz 288p signal (314 instead of 313). This causes problems on several displays because the excess lines (when line-multiplied) is not tolerated. The Sony W series is notorious for very strict tolerances, and can not do more than line double even with other signals.

    You can try the Panasonic hack, under Compatibility in the menu.
    junkerhq.net/xrgb/index.php?title=OSSC#Compatibility

    Otherwise, I’m afraid you’re pretty screwed. You could try 60Hz mode if you have a modded PS2.

    in reply to: Firmware 0.87 / 0.88 #42770
    Harrumph
    Participant

    That’s awesome Megari!

    in reply to: GameCube and GameBoy Player help needed #42769
    Harrumph
    Participant

    Brief instructions Here, you can either use a separate cli file, or append the two needed options at the end of the dol file (use a simple text editor, but actually IIRC this is already done in the ”.dol+cli” file, which then is simply renamed to end with just .dol).
    Personally I use the hdcustom setting, in contrast to hd60 it has barely any stutter because the framerate is so much closer to original. In that case modify file accordingly (the default in the gbi-ossc files is hd60).

    in reply to: GameCube and GameBoy Player help needed #42734
    Harrumph
    Participant

    No you just need an action replay disk and a SD-to-memorycard adapter, aka SD Media Launcher.

    in reply to: GameCube and GameBoy Player help needed #42705
    Harrumph
    Participant

    Depends on what the total line length of the custom resolution you tested. The output of linedoubled 480p on ossc would be 1716 samples (2×858) using dtv timing (using vesa timing would be incorrect for gamecube).
    You could still try getting a better image from gameboy player by using GBI (Game Boy Interface), where you can get a 360p output that the OSSC can linedouble to 720p, or linetriple to 1080p. I’d recommend running it via Swiss.
    Game boy interface high fidelity version

    in reply to: SNES video/audio randomly cuts out in HDMI mode but not DVI #42704
    Harrumph
    Participant

    If the problem is due to your display not liking the SNES sync jitter, then I don’t believe the HD retrovision anti-jitter system cannot help. Their fix attempts to correct horizontal sync jitter on the rising edge (which is a more general case, affecting many consoles on some specific displays component input) while the root of SNES specific jitter is on the vertical sync, where NTSC SNES is missing one clock cycle every other frame.

    in reply to: GameCube and GameBoy Player help needed #42637
    Harrumph
    Participant

    Not enough information. GC game or using GBP? Are you modifying any setting with Swiss?
    An output of 720p doesnt make sense anyhow, if the OSSC is set to passthrough.

    in reply to: Does the OSSC 1.6 support anamorphic widescreen? #42618
    Harrumph
    Participant

    Linedoubled 480p to 960p is a non-standard format (1440×960), so it depends on the display. If the display does not want to stretch it, then the aspect ratio will be too narrow (if widescreen content).

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 558 total)